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Posts Tagged ‘Tern Conservation’

Hello from Metinic!

My name is Sequoia, I am one of the two technicians on Metinic Island this summer. I am currently going into my third year at the University of Maine, majoring in wildlife ecology. 

I grew up in a small town in upstate New York, named Moravia. I am an avid outdoors person. I enjoy birding, hunting, hiking, cross country skiing, horseback riding and herping.

While I might not be a “bird person” I wanted to spend this summer learning more about birds so that I can apply the knowledge in the future. Also who wouldn’t want to spend the summer living on such a beautiful island!

My name is Emma and I am the other technician here on Metinic Island. I am a senior at the University of Rhode Island, finishing up my bachelor’s degree in wildlife and conservation biology. Sequoia and I share similar interests, including hiking and working with horses. I enjoy birding along the coast of Rhode Island, especially when there are shorebirds and seaducks involved.

I am thrilled to be spending the summer in such a special place. One of the highlights for me so far was seeing all of the warblers as they passed through during migration. The species diversity on Metinic keeps us on our toes and we never know what we will see next!

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Sequoia on the left and Emma on the right.

We have a bit of catching up to do. We started out the season with a two week quarantine. After flipping a coin, Emma ended up camping in the shed. It wasn’t as bad as it may sound. In fact, one of the best parts about sleeping outside is hearing the storm-petrels at night!

During our first week, we rounded up the 120 resident sheep and moved them away from the tern nesting area. More recently, we kept busy counting the 209 gull nests and 36 common eider nests on the north side of the island. We are continuously documenting all of the amazing bird species here and continue to monitor the common and arctic terns as they get settled and start nesting.

Currently we’ve documented more than 200 tern nests but we’d estimate around 250-300 have been established. Last Sunday we saw the first herring gull chicks hatching and Wednesday we spotted the first ten common eider chicks. 

Though we are already three weeks into the season, we will catch you up as we go. So keep checking in to see what Metinic Island has to offer!

Until next time,

Sequoia & Emma

 

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Two Herring Gull chicks around three days old.

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One of the gorgeous Arctic Terns on Metinic Island.

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A Black Guillemot prouldy proclaiming it’s property.

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The first sighting of Common Eider ducklings this season! The adults stay close to the ducklings to protect them from predators.

 

 

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Hello everyone, this is Bobby writing to you from Ship Island with some breaking news.

The bird word must have gone around, because as of Thursday, July 11th, 321 nests have been found and marked with more being discovered every day! The chaos on the tern nesting beach area is beginning; the eggs laid in late June have begun to hatch this week. Soon our island will be filled with extremely adorable fuzzy chicks who love to run and hide in whatever grass or shelter they can find!

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One of the first chicks on Ship, easily one of the softest objects one could ever hold.

These toddler-like chicks are extremely curious and will wander away pretty far from their nests if given a chance. With them running around all over, it can be difficult to tell how the colony chicks are doing health wise and how many of these chicks are surviving to adulthood. This is answered through a protocol that all of the islands perform known as productivity plots. This may sound like a fancy term, but essentially Colin and I determined a group of nests with eggs that were laid earlier in the season (in our case in late June) that neighbored each other and constructed fencing around them to enclose this area.

 

COTE on colins head

Colin (pictured) and I constantly had terns going at our heads to protect their nests while we constructed productivity plots. This one very nicely went feet first to our heads instead of the usual sharp bill first.

This keeps the chicks from our nests of focus from running all over the beach getting into trouble, that way we can determine how many chicks are surviving to adulthood and the size increases of each chick from each nest within our plots. To determine which chick is which, we put stylish metal BBL bands on their right legs that give them a unique identification number for life in a large online database. Colin and I then check each nest in each plot every morning to monitor the eggs and chicks. I am not a parent, but I imagine how I feel when we look for the chicks every morning it is similar to the stressful situation of a parent trying to find their misplaced kids, as Colin and I are really attached to our chicks in the plots. It has been amazing to see the transformation from egg to chick, and soon from chick to fledgling. Watching them grow up has been so special for Colin and I, and we can’t wait to see each chick’s journey continue. More updates coming soon!

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One of the many chicks hatching this weekend, this one hatched within the hour before this photo with a big world to explore!

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This past week on Ship has been very similar to what has been going on at Metinic and PMI. Most of our days have been pretty dreary. On these foggy and rainy days we spend our time reading (A+ to Morgan for reading 8 books so far), eating snacks, catching up on sleep, writing letters, drawing, and staying updated on what’s going on in the real world. It is relaxing, but we’re anxious to get back out there and get a closer look on how our terns our doing.

When it’s not too foggy out, we are able to sit outside and watch the colony. We don’t sit too close because we don’t want to surprise or scare them. We’ve been doing this frequently to deter the Peregrine Falcon who has been stopping by from the island.

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Sunset view while watching for predators

Before the bad weather, we spent most days attempting to re-sight bands, making productivity plots, and trapping adult terns to band, measure, and weigh. To trap the terns we use a Treadle Trap. We first need to replace the eggs with fake eggs. This prevents the tern from damaging their eggs once he/she is trapped. After this we place a wired box over the nest with one end open. When the bird steps through the opening onto the pad, the door will shut and the tern is unable to escape. We quickly retrieve the bird to collect our data, put back the original eggs, set him free, and repeat. It was pretty cool when I got to hold and release my first tern!

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One of our productivity plots

The results from our GOMSWG census indicated that we have about 620 nests in total. Hopefully we’ll start seeing some chicks soon!

-Amanda

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