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Posts Tagged ‘PMI 2017’

Greetings from Petit Manan Island!

Bradford and I have been on PMI for two weeks now, and yesterday we were joined by Kelby and Jenna so now our island crew is complete!

A lot of the work so far has depended on whether or not the birds are around and if the weather is nice, but one constant effort has been the daily tower counts. We have been climbing up the 134 steps of the lighthouse once in the morning at 7:00AM and once in the evening at 5:00PM to count the number of Atlantic Puffins, Razorbills, Black Guillemots, Common Murres, and Common Eiders in the water and around the island. In the morning, we usually see around 70 puffins, 50 razorbill, 150 guillemots, 90 eiders and there is a pair of murres that are seen from time to time. This morning, we had our highest counts of the season for puffins, at 121, and for razorbills, at 63. In the evenings, we have been counting fewer birds overall as many have ventured further out to sea to forage for food.

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PMI Lighthouse

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Steps leading up to the top of the tower

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The view of the grounds from the top of the tower

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View of Green Island and the boat house from the top of the tower

I have really enjoyed doing these tower counts daily. The view from the top of the lighthouse of the grounds and surrounding islands is beautiful. It is also amazing to be able to observe all of the birds that are hanging out on and around the island. Plus climbing up and down all those steps is great exercise:)

That’s all for now!

~Micaela

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It’s been a little over a week since I first came to Petit Manan Island, and I’m already in love with it. Before coming, I was a little skeptical about climbing the second tallest lighthouse in Maine twice a day to do tower counts, as well as the 3-mile foghorn that goes off roughly every 30 seconds, 24/7. I have definitely gotten used to the heights and the foghorn, the latter becoming more like a calming constant throughout the day, much like the constant ticking of a wall clock, only bigger, and much louder. Other than getting used to the ins-and-outs of island life, bird activity has been slow. Generally, the terns and alcids are here during the morning but leave to forage for most of the day, only coming back to roost just as the last rays of light are disappearing over the horizon. When the birds are here though, we are seeing more and more nesting behavior, including courtship displays, copulation, and scraping. We have already found our first eggs of the season, eider, tern, and puffin! I’m excited for the season to really ramp up and to find a lot more nests in the coming week.

PMI_2017_May23_First Tern Egg

First tern nest found of the season, 5/23/2017.

— Bradford

 

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