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Posts Tagged ‘Petit Manan 2014’

Black Guillemots have begun to nest on Petit Manan and for the last couple weeks we have been busy locating burrows and marking them for monitoring. Other alcids, inlcuding Razorbills and Atlantic Puffins have begun to nest, too! Rock crevices and under washed up wood is where Guillemots choose to nest. Searching for burrows includes kneeling down to rock or wood level and looking for 1-2 eggs or an adult Guillemot. Finding them could get tricky!!

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Searching a tricky burrow under the boat ramp.

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More burrow searching…

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Guillemot eggs.

June 27th was Guillemot Appreciation Day and to celebrate we made paper Guillemots to send to the other islands. Here on Petit Manan, everyday is Guillemot Appreciation Day with our own special Guillemot hanging over the kitchen table.

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We searched the whole island perimeter and found 65 Black Guillemot burrows. The island crew will return to the marked Guillemot burrows every 3 days for monitoring. Also, we have 48 Atlantic Puffin burrows and 4 Razorbill burrows.

Today, we checked burrows and found 3 Guillemot chicks! Andddd while we were checking for Guillemots we found our first Puffin chicks and Razorbill chicks!!

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Puffin Chick!!

Looking forward to all our alcid chicks hatching!

-Brittany 🙂

 

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What is that sound walking to the outhouse in the dark of night?! It’s a Leach’s Storm-Petrel! Its call is a spooky one to hear for a person like me unacquainted with the “giggling” sound. I heard my first petrel call here on Petit Manan. Pretty cool!

While the other inhabitants of the island are roosting at night, Leach’s Storm-Petrels are active searching for a mate and a burrow dug from the soil. They are a secretive, nocturnal, and pelagic species only returning to land to breed and active at night to avoid predation. Petrels lay one egg that is incubated for 37-50 days and chicks fledge in September or October.

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Julia with a Leach’s Storm-Petrel adult

Early in the season, we venture out in search of petrel burrows. Our goal is to mark 20 active burrows with colored flags. How do you know it’s active? You reach into the burrow (1-3 feet in length) to find a nest cup, nesting material, or a petrel! Often burrows curve, so a burrow camera can be used to reach where your whole arm cannot. One indication of Leach’s Storm-Petrels is their musty smell at the entrance of a burrow.

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Wayne smells a petrel

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Burrow entrance

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Julia holding the camera and Anna wearing the viewing screen

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Burrow camera in use

Later in the season we will return to the flagged burrows and determine the presence of an egg. Then return again to check for a hatched chick. In the meantime, we will continue with our tern and alcid activities. Look for Petit Manan’s next post for some exciting news!

-Brittany

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