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Posts Tagged ‘Fish and Wildlife Service’

Come meet the 2019 Petit Manan Crew!

Hello all! My name is Hallie Daly, and I am one of the lucky bird-nerds that gets to call PMI their home for the summer. I have been working with wildlife for about 9 years now, having started my obsession when I was just 13 years old. I graduated from the University of California, Davis in 2017 with my degree in wildlife, fish, and conservation biology. I have been lucky enough to have worked internationally on a variety of conservation projects in Romania, the United Kingdom, Guyana, the United States, and most recently American Samoa, with everything from plants, large carnivores, squirrels, bats, and birds. Coming to work with the USFWS at PMI is such an exciting opportunity for me, as I have never worked with a breeding colony of seabirds before! Aside from enjoying wildlife, you can often find me backpacking the John Muir Trail in California, reading books about paleontology, painting, and making horrible puns! I have so much to learn and am so excited to apply my knowledge and skills from my past experiences towards the conservation of these beautiful birds.

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Hallie with a Eurasian Skylark in Aberdeen, Scotland

Hi everyone! My name is Jimmy Welch and I am the supervisor here on PMI for the summer. I am a returning intern and was first a research technician in the summer of 2016 here on PMI. I have since worked with prairie dogs in New Mexico, sea turtles in North Carolina and researched scavengers and small mammals in Maine. I’ve also recently graduated from the University of New England in May 2019 with a degree in Animal Behavior and Environmental Science. I decided I wanted to come back to work for MCINWR and I was lucky enough to be able to return to my favorite island, PMI! I am really excited for the field season and the opportunity to work with such amazing seabird species again. I hope to utilize my previous experience on the island and my diverse field work background to make it a great summer for the PMI crew and all of the wonderful birds here on PMI.

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Jimmy with two black guillemot chicks on PMI 2016

Hey everyone, my name is Devon Jobe and I’m one of the newest researchers working with the USFWS here on Petit Manan Island! I am a rising second-year student at the University of Maine, and am majoring in both Wildlife Ecology as well as Forestry. That being said, this is only my first real position in my field of study and is a totally new and awesome experience for me! I feel so lucky to have been given the opportunity to be part of  such an exciting project working with breeding seabirds, and I can say with confidence that it is shaping up to be the most interesting introduction into the field of Wildlife Ecology I could have hoped for! I still have a lot to learn but I’m looking forward to doing it here on PMI.

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Devon at Wildland Firefighter Training.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Recently on Petit Manan Island we have been conducting chick provisioning studies. The purpose of these observations is to determine what prey species are being fed to tern chicks in order to see how prey composition is related to tern chick survival rates. We also record the time of the feedings, which chick is being fed, and the size of each prey item. Over the last decade the fish diversity on Petit Manan has increased. Although it allows us to see new and exciting fish species, it is not a positive sign for the terns. Increased feedings of invertebrate species such as moths, dragonflies, and other insects are also not great signs. Invertebrates and some fish are not as nutrient rich as herring and similar fish species, making them less beneficial for tern chicks. In 2006, common tern feedings consisted of 95% herring. Data from more recent years show that herring has dropped to 25% in 2010 and 34% in 2013 for common terns. Other fish species, such as hake and sandlance, have increased in feeding frequency. Although we do observe feedings of herring, hake, and sandlance, a large proportion of the feedings have consisted of tiny invertebrates and low quality fish species. Throughout the summer we have seen a total of 14 fish species, two aquatic marine invertebrate species, and at least 2 terrestrial invertebrate species being fed to chicks.

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Herring and Hake, respectively

Species like butterfish, lumpfish and three-spined stickleback are not high quality prey items because often tern chicks are unable to swallow the fish. Butterfish are disc-shaped, and often they are too wide for chicks to swallow. Lumpfish are a rough, round fish species that chicks can only eat when the fish are very small. Sticklebacks, as their name implies, have spines on their back that catch in the chicks’ throat when being swallowed.  We often find them uneaten near nest bowls.

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View from Chick Provisioning Blind

Some of the factors that are believed to be causing these changes in fish composition are ocean warming and overfishing. Over the last two years ocean warming has been affecting seabird populations on both the Atlantic and the Pacific Ocean. Seabirds are indicators of marine ecosystem health. Tern breeding pairs have been decreasing on Petit Manan Island for at least the past seven years, and this season marked the first time the total count of tern nests dropped below 1,000. As recently as 2009 Petit Manan was home to 2,500 pairs of terns. This could be indicating that the food availability in the Gulf of Maine is failing, and the terns are not able to find enough prey to be able to reproduce after their migration. To get a sense of what prey species are available to seabirds, we can use our provisioning data as a sample of the prey availability in the waters around Petit Manan Island. Also we can look at provisioning data to see how the rapid warming of water in the Gulf of Maine is affecting prey populations; in particular the herring population.

Using data from all of Maine Coastal Islands NWR and Project Puffin islands, we can learn what is happening in the Gulf of Maine system. This data will assist in monitoring the effects of a warming Gulf of Maine on the marine food web and what this means for the future of our seabirds and fisheries in Maine.

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Butterfish and Three-Spined Stickleback, respectively

I have really enjoyed doing these studies because it is exciting to watch the chicks’ daily activities and often the time goes by quickly. For our provisioning studies, each person has a blind that they spend time making observations from every other day. Returning to this specific area every other day is a great way to allow us to see the progress of the chicks and allows us to get to know each chick’s habits. These studies also allow us to see many different fish species as the terns bring them to feed their chicks. This is another great part of the job because it helps us work on our fish identification skills.

-Jimmy and Jill

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This week Petit Manan welcomes the remainder of our crew- Shelby and Jimmy! And with them they brought nesting terns and beautiful weather!

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The view from the top of Petit Manan Light. We keep track of Alcid populations by counting them from the top of the Light twice a day!

As our second week on Petit Manan comes to a close, we have given up our reign of the island to the birds. No longer can we go to the outhouse in the middle of the night without hearing the territorial “ka-ka-ka” of Common Terns before they swoop towards our heads. Where once we could walk freely there are now hidden nests and incubating mothers that we must be careful not to disturb. And we couldn’t be more excited!

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One of four Common Eider nests we have found this week. Many more Eiders nest on neighboring Green Island.

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While searching for red-backed salamanders, I found this year’s first Savannah Sparrow’s nest hiding under a rotting log!

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And finally the one we’ve all been waiting for… the first tern egg of the season! Since then we have found three more nests, but without the safety in numbers of the whole colony nesting, these terns may have abandoned their egg so not to be targeted by Peregrine Falcons.

We hope to have another Egg-cellent week, as next we begin checking rock crevices and artificial burrows for Atlantic Puffin, Razorbill, and Black Guillemot eggs!

Until next time here is a bit of wisdom, “I value my garden more for being full of blackbirds than of cherries, and very frankly give them fruit for their songs.” -Joseph Addison

Best,

Morgan

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Petit Manan Seabird Researchers 2016 – Shelby, Jimmy, Jill, & Morgan

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