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Posts Tagged ‘dowitchers’

We’re coming to a close here on Metinic. Most of our tern chicks are flying around or landing near the water’s edge. We’ve taken down most of our productivity plots, since we can’t monitor chicks that can fly out when we get close. The guillemot chicks get closer to fledging every time we check the burrows.

Shorebirds are becoming more and more plentiful, with dozens of short-billed dowitchers and semipalmated sandpipers flitting around the north end of the island every day. Several whimbrels have taken up residence atop the hill by the gull colony and a few semipalmated plovers, least sandpipers, ruddy turnstones, and yellowlegs have been gleaning the tide line for food.

SBDO

Short-billed dowitchers use their long bills to probe deep into the seaweed

RUTU

Ruddy turnstones got their name from their habit of flipping small rocks to seek food

It’s the time of year for berries, and the island is covered in raspberry bushes in full fruit. A few early blueberries can also be found growing low to the ground. On one of our birding trips through the woods, we came across a bountiful clearing rife with raspberries. It was a great spot for a snack break.

Raspberries

Snack time!

We’ll be heading back to the mainland on Tuesday. It’s been a great summer out here of monitoring birds, racking up bird species (still at 96), and chasing sheep. The weather has generally been fantastic, and the sunsets continue to be beautiful. It’s bittersweet to leave, but as the terns depart, so must we.

Sunset

Sunset from the tern colony

So long, and thanks for reading!

-Mark and Helen

Metinic 2016 Crew

Metinic 2016 crew banding an arctic tern

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I can’t believe the season is more than halfway over! Yet there is still so much to observe and enjoy here on Petit Manan island. Recently we have begun to see the first of the arctic migrants, such as dowitchers and sandpipers. We have even seen some wandering passerines like mockingbirds, mourning doves and a fledgling robin. It says something about islands life when seeing a robin is a big surprise!

Unfortunately, the terns have had a rather bad stretch of luck. The combination of bad weather, predation and (seemingly) lack of food have had a huge impact on chick numbers. Parts of the island have done better then others. However, the colony doing okay. We even have a few fledglings flying around!

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Most disconcerting, for us researchers, has been watching the great blacked-back gulls swooping in and picking off tern chicks. They are efficient predators. It is equal parts interesting and terrifying to see them hunting. Jill got a great photo of one taking an eider duckling, so you can see one in action below.

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This weekend we have been joined by Bangor high-school student Max. He’s been an excellent addition to the crew and has been a great help with our research. Here he is examining a tern egg this evening.

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