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Posts Tagged ‘Common Tern eggs’

This past week on Ship has been very similar to what has been going on at Metinic and PMI. Most of our days have been pretty dreary. On these foggy and rainy days we spend our time reading (A+ to Morgan for reading 8 books so far), eating snacks, catching up on sleep, writing letters, drawing, and staying updated on what’s going on in the real world. It is relaxing, but we’re anxious to get back out there and get a closer look on how our terns our doing.

When it’s not too foggy out, we are able to sit outside and watch the colony. We don’t sit too close because we don’t want to surprise or scare them. We’ve been doing this frequently to deter the Peregrine Falcon who has been stopping by from the island.

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Sunset view while watching for predators

Before the bad weather, we spent most days attempting to re-sight bands, making productivity plots, and trapping adult terns to band, measure, and weigh. To trap the terns we use a Treadle Trap. We first need to replace the eggs with fake eggs. This prevents the tern from damaging their eggs once he/she is trapped. After this we place a wired box over the nest with one end open. When the bird steps through the opening onto the pad, the door will shut and the tern is unable to escape. We quickly retrieve the bird to collect our data, put back the original eggs, set him free, and repeat. It was pretty cool when I got to hold and release my first tern!

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One of our productivity plots

The results from our GOMSWG census indicated that we have about 620 nests in total. Hopefully we’ll start seeing some chicks soon!

-Amanda

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This weekend the Ship Island crew headed over to Pond Island to take part in a beach cleanup along the shore. Morgan and I, as well as several other volunteers, collected dozens of trash bags filled with lost buoys, cans, bottles, and more. This year is the first year the group will be able to actually recycle the plastic that was collected. Through the company, TerraCycle, our collection of plastics, no matter how dirty or broken they may seem, will be sent over to be thoroughly cleaned and re-purposed. Typically, most objects made out of recycled plastic only consist of about 30% reused material. Though it doesn’t seem like a lot, or maybe even not enough, if the concentration is increased then the new object becomes closer to the end of its lifespan and can no longer be reused. It was good to get off the island and spend some time with others working to keep our environment clean, but we’re glad to be back on Ship with our terns!

 

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Section of a boat that was found washed to shore. We needed all hands on deck to carry this one over!

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Beach Cleanup Volunteers

Back home on Ship, we’ve had problems with other birds predating on our Common Terns and their eggs. Currently, Great Black-backed Gulls, Herring Gulls, American Crows, Peregrine Falcons, and Northern Harriers are our main concerns. Almost every day we spend two hour shifts in the blinds to observe the tern behavior and keep an eye out for any of these predators that might pass by. During the evening we’ve been marking nests with predation sticks so we can notice if any eggs have gone missing. By doing this we are also able to get a good idea on how many terns we really have on the island. It doesn’t look like it, but so far we have counted over 500 nests, which means we have over 1000 terns! So far so good! In a few days we will be doing a GOMSWG census which will give us an even closer estimate on our tern population size. We’re excited to share the results with you next week!

-Amanda

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Rose and Mary here with a quick blog before the last sunset of our summer on Ship Island.  It has been a wonderful time and we are both leaving here with many memories that we’ll keep for a life-time.  From finding the first common tern eggs

Literally our first egg found on May 28

Literally our first egg found on May 28

 

to our 4th of July grilling party with burgers, 2 pies, chips, cherries, and corn on the cob…

Rose preparing our all-out fourth of July "burgers."

Rose preparing our all-out fourth of July “burgers.”

to identifying a black skimmer after tropical storm Arthur (a somewhat rare species up this far north, typical after southern storms)….

Black Skimmer, Common Tern and Eider legs

Black Skimmer, Common Tern and Eider legs

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Common tern fledgling exploring the beach.

to watching fledglings fly and touch the water for the first time.

We have learned so much about common terns and island living.  As far as we can tell so far, without having computed our final numbers, our colony did very well this year.  While the peregrine falcon and merlin visited nearly daily after chicks hatched, they did not disturb the terns enough to affect the whole colony.  The larger of the storms down-poured over 3 inches of rain at times, yet miraculously we had very little loss due to the weather.  The Ship Island Common Tern colony is a prime example of a restoration island success story and it has been wonderful to be a part of this effort.  Thanks to the Maine Coastal Islands National Wildlife Refuge Staff for giving us this opportunity and for the amazing seabird restoration and management work that you do!

Hasta luego! (Until next time!)  Rose and Mary

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Last walk on the tern colony beach.

One of our last sunsets.

One of our last sunsets. Enjoy the rest of summer!

 

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