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Archive for July 8th, 2017

This past week on Ship Morgan and I both took our short breaks off the island. While Morgan was away I was joined by Kelby from PMI to work on predator control, productivity plot management, chick banding, and more!

We’re starting to see more and more chicks every day! Usually when we’re checking the productivity plots we can see when they start pipping. This is when their little beaks start to break open the egg. This lets us know that the next day we will definitely have some new arrivals to weigh and band if they’re dry and ready.

Before we start provisioning, we still have some time to re-sight birds from previous years. Typically, they will have a small silver BBL band on their ankle which contains either 8 or 9 numbers. We can use a spotting scope to see these numbers and enter them into a database where we can learn more information about that bird, such as it’s age. To make re-sighting easier, we put up posts for them to perch on so they aren’t being covered by the vegetation and are closer for us to see. While I was re-sighting from the blind, I spotted a tern that hasn’t been re-sighted in 19 years! I also found one with an orange band. This means that it was banded all the way in Argentina, which I thought was pretty cool.

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An example of a BBL band that can be found on the leg of a Common Tern. As you can see they are very small, which makes them difficult to read.

Now that the owl is gone, we are starting to see more birds come back to the colony. Many of them left during the time he was here and abandoned their nests. Thankfully now they’re starting to scrape the ground and re-nest. Chick age distribution around the island will surely be scattered, but at least they’re not giving up!

Now that I’m back on the island, there’s a lot more chicks running around and much more work to do!

-Amanda

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Greetings from Petit Manan!

This week we have been focused on monitoring the productivity and provisioning for the chicks on the island. The tern chicks in our productivity plots have been growing strong, many now weighing over 100 grams. So far during our provisioning stints, we are seeing tern chicks mainly being fed herring, hake and sand lance. These are good food sources for the chicks!

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Common tern feeding its chick a sand lance

We have also seen many adult puffins flying into burrows with fish, which means more puffin chicks may have hatched this week. So far we have confirmed that 3 puffin chicks have hatched, but we are seeing puffins enter some of the deeper burrows carrying fish, which suggests more may have hatched as well.  We will begin puffin productivity this coming week, where we will do a more thorough search to determine how many chick have actually hatched! Unlike terns, which usually only bring one fish at a time when feeding chicks, puffins are able to carry multiple fish in their beaks at a time! This makes provisioning a bit trickier, since rather than having to identify one fish, there could be multiple. Also, the puffins tend to duck into their burrows quickly after landing with food for their chicks which can also make identification difficult. We decided to try putting a GoPro in one of our puffin boxes this morning to see if we could possibly use GoPros in some of the man-made puffin boxes to add to our puffin provisioning data. We were able to take some pictures of a puffin chick being fed by its parent!

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Puffin chick being fed by its parent

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Puffin chick checking out the GoPro

The puffins are my favorite birds on the island, so I look forward to finding more chicks this week!

~Micaela

 

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