Feeds:
Posts
Comments

The past few weeks on The Brothers Islands have been interesting, mainly because hurricane Arthur came through with winds almost reaching 70 mph. During hurricane Arthur a volunteer biologist, Steve, was out here on the Brothers Islands while Baxter and I were on our break. When Baxter and I returned to the island after our break Steve said the outhouse had blown away 10 feet, and our large observation blind was blown 20 feet. To our surprise the blind had barely taken any damage. All Baxter, Linda, Jim, Steve, and I needed to do was put the stand back up and secure it back into place.

sunset jay

                Baxter and I feared that the tern chicks might not have made it through the hurricane, but surprisingly enough both tern chicks are alive and well. Although the chicks can be sneaky and hard to find hiding in the knee high grass they are both developing at a promising rate.  As you can see from the picture they have grown up so much since they first hatched. The other two tern eggs are completely intact as well, in fact they are both piping. We expect to see them hatched very soon. Every other day we check the tern chick’s productivity which means we measure their wing cord and the weight of the chicks.

 

Baxter took a great photo of the two tern chicks together:

DSC_0100

Just as our tern chicks are developing, so are our guillemot chicks. Many more have hatched, so Baxter and I have started a two day rotation for burrow checks. This allows us to gather more rate of growth information since the chicks grow up so fast. Here is a picture of Baxter measuring the wing cord of a guillemot chick:

DSC_0069

More updates coming soon,

Jason

I just finished up a week on Ship Island and had such an amazing and unique experience! This summer I have been interning with US Fish and Wildlife up at Moosehorn N.W.R. in downeast Maine as a part of the Career Discovery Internship Program. My whole summer has been a whirlwind of new experiences and this week was no exception. To give the Island Supervisor Mary a break, I jumped right in fulfilling the normal day-to-day duties here on Ship. Having pretty much zero experience with birds, I admittedly arrived a bit nervous not knowing exactly what I would be doing. However, that feeling quickly faded as everyone jumped in to teach me the ropes.

I would have to say my favorite task of all would be productivity plots. It is amazing to physically see and measure the growth of a Common Tern chick. By monitoring the chicks daily I was able to see the different stages in growth from the starring of an egg to using a 300 g scale as the chicks continued to rapidly grow. I even avoided, for the most part, getting pooped on!

Banding a chick during productivity plots.

Banding a chick during productivity plots.

Ship Island is a beautiful place with an important goal to protect and to monitor the Common Tern. It’s been great having a chance to take part in that even for this short amount of time. In all, this week was not only a great educational experience but also a time for me to unplug and soak up the “Island life”. I saw the majestic sunset on my own private beach, and I even had the chance to take my first solar shower! It was surprisingly refreshing!

Enjoying the sunset with a cup of tea.

Enjoying the sunset with a cup of tea.

The infamous solar shower.

The infamous solar shower.

Thanks again for the opportunity!

Adrianna

As the heat of July settles in on Metinic, our birds, especially all those chicks we have, all need ways to keep cool.

Like humans, birds need to keep their bodies at a specific temperature. However, birds lack one of the key ways humans keep cool: the ability to sweat . So how does an animal covered in feathers and/or down make it through the summer without suffering from heatstroke? (No, the answer isn’t air conditioning or lots of ice cream)

A guillemot chick, sporting a black down coat for the summer

A guillemot chick, sporting a black down coat for the summer

This isn’t that hard for swimming seabirds like Common Eiders. Even though these ducklings are dressed in down coats for the summer, they don’t run the risk of overheating because they hop straight in to the cold coastal waters, sometimes on the day they hatch! Adults and ducklings alike will spend almost all their time in the water, occasionally hopping up onto rocks to preen.

Four eider ducklings tag along with mom

Six eider ducklings tag along with mom

However, chicks that aren’t ready to swim on day one can’t just jump in the water for a nice cool dip. Black Guillemots have found one of the simplest solutions to keeping their chicks comfortable – keep them out of the sun. Along with providing protection from hungry gulls, a guillemot’s burrow is shaded and cool. The chicks won’t leave the burrows until they are ready to swim, and then they can chill like the eiders.

A guillemot parent and two chicks (one freshly hatched) in a nice cool burrow

A guillemot parent and two chicks (one freshly hatched) in a nice cool burrow

So what if you’re stuck on the land, without a shady burrow like, say, a tern chick? You start out getting a little help from mom and dad. When tern chicks are small enough, they can be brooded by their parents. This behavior does double duty: it keeps chicks warm on cold nights and mornings, and provides cool (or at least cooler) shade during hot days.

An adult Arctic Tern brooding a chick

An adult Arctic Tern brooding a chick

Some chicks still seem to want to be brooded even when they are far too big.

A patient Arctic Tern parent "broods" a chick

A patient Arctic Tern parent “broods” a chick

If the parents are off fishing, something they spend most of their time doing once the chicks are a bit bigger, the chicks have to keep themselves cool. The simplest strategy is familiar to anyone with a pet dog: panting. Adults and chicks alike can be seen panting on hot days.

A panting tern chick

A panting tern chick

Once mobile, usually just a few days after hatching, tern chicks can seek out shade on their own by escaping under a rock or into the cooler grass. It isn’t unusual for us to find “chick tunnels” marking the path chicks take back and forth between their nests (where they get food from their parents) and a safe spot in the grass. We also put out three-sided structures known as “chick huts” in more exposed areas without much natural shelter.

 

A Arctic Tern chick (colored for a provisioning study) takes shelter in a shady chick hut

A Arctic Tern chick (colored for a provisioning study) takes shelter in a shady chick hut

Hope all our readers are staying cool as well!

-Amy

Another day on Petit Manan Island, yes there is major seabird action going on here on our island right now – our terns and alcids are hatching daily and eider chicks are running about, but this post is all about what goes on behind the scenes, the things that keep this island going, the things that maybe aren’t so glorifying.

So to keep everybody in line here on PMI we have something called “Worm Duties.” Everyday, someone new is the “worm-of-the-day” and they have to basically do all the house chores, daily weather, and alcid counts of the day. To make being the “worm” extra special, we have to wear the worm hat while working. As we say it has special powers and makes you work harder, maybe even faster so you can take it off quickly!

The worm hat holder

The worm hat holder

Compost dumping worm

Compost dumping worm

Working worm

Working worm

Recycling worm

Recycling worm

Mowing the lawn

Worm mowing the lawn

As well as other island duties:

Choppin Wood

Learning to chop wood

ongoing bow net tweeking

Ongoing bow net tweeking

 

Building chick houses

Building chick houses

Cleaning boat ramp

Cleaning boat ramp

Wow I”m exhausted just looking at all these working photos,  oh no got to go! Time for Tern Productivity checks then Leach’s storm petrel checks and data entry!

-Wayne

 

 

 

 

We’re up to our elbows in chicks out on Metinic. In my last post, I mentioned that our tern chicks have started to hatch. A week later, our little fluffy friends are growing up fast.

Arctic Tern Chick

Arctic Tern Chick

We can often see our older chicks testing out their wings, although they are still a long way from being airborne.

An Arctic Tern chicks, stretching its wings

An Arctic Tern chicks, stretching its wings

Our resident Savannah Sparrows also have chicks of their own. These buzzy-sounding birds build a classic cup-shaped nest in grass on the ground. It can be easy to miss until you see the five squawking mouths.

A nest full of Savannah Sparrow chicks

A nest full of Savannah Sparrow chicks

Spotted Sandpipers are Metinic’s only nesting shorebird this year, and our first sandpiper chicks have made an appearance. Despite their small size and their resemblance to a cotton ball standing on a pair of toothpicks, these chicks are up and running around by day one. They do have a parent around to keep them out of trouble though!

Spotted Sandpiper adult (left) and chick (right)

Spotted Sandpiper adult (left) and chick (right)

Finally, we found our first Black Guillemot chicks. It’s hard not to love these little black puffballs. Guillemots are also the only alcid to lay two eggs at once, so guillemot chicks usually come in pairs.

Our first pair of Black Guillemot chicks

Our first pair of Black Guillemot chicks

Of course, Syd and I didn’t want to miss out on the fun of Guillemot Appreciation Day, so we celebrated in the most delicious way we could!

Our tasty guillemot cake

Our tasty guillemot cake

More updates as our chicks continue to grow!

 

-Amy

Blue Hill Bay Census

When you live on an island for a summer it is quite a big deal when you get to step off your island for any period of time.  We have found here on Ship Island that even going out in our rowboat a few hundred feet from shore to pick up a grocery delivery can give you a totally new perspective for the day.  Having been on the island for over 6 weeks now, it was a treat for me to tag along with Jim (our boat operator/maintenance/all around go to guy) on the Blue Hill Bay Census.  While all the islands we have staff living on are surveyed during the GOMSWG census, Jim has the duty of boating the various bays and inlets up and down the coast searching areas where seabirds have nested historically and recently.  Here is a picture leaving Ship Island…

ImageJim and I did a four hour loop throughout the Blue Hill Bay region stopping to look at places such as Sand Island, The Nub, Goose Rock, Indian Point ledges, Folly Island, and The Hub.  We were excited to report a thriving little colony of around 150-200 Common Terns on Conary Nub.  Not only did we discover a 4-egg clutch (fairly rare), but also more developed chicks than here on Ship Island, suggesting they hatched around a week and a half earlier.

ImageImage

 

Finally, while this may sound a bit crazy to all our readers out there who live on the mainland, I would like to comment on how wonderful it was to see trees and to smell trees.  While we have various types of vegetation out here, including fragrant sea roses, wild irises, and rustling tall grasses, none of them really add up to having a “tree” status.  We do have a groove of chokecherry “trees” and our giant cow parsnip is now at least 6 feet tall, but it’s just not the same as a spruce/fir forest.  Here is a view of a typical spruce studded island called The Hub off Bartlett Island with the mountains of western Mount Desert Island (Acadia National Park) in the background.

Image

 

Cheers!

Mary

 

This week has been an exciting week for the Brothers Islands. Not only have we switched island technicians (Baxter has switched with Rose from Ship Island for the week), but tern eggs have hatched and we have two little tern chicks! It has been years since tern chicks have been recorded on the Brothers Islands so it is a big success for us. The parents of the chicks have become very protective of their chicks and have been observed chasing gulls, ravens, and even a few bald eagles. When Rose and I go to check for the chicks the terns start dive-bombing us and screeching, apparently they don’t enjoy our company too much.

   IMG_1249

Tern Chick just poking his beak through his shell

                On another positive note we have regularly been seeing four or more terns when we do our observations, which means there is a least one additional tern pair that is interested in our colony. These new additions of terns are usually around to help protect the chicks. We haven’t been able to determine if there are more than three terns nesting on this island yet but it seems very possible.

IMG_0038 (1)

Two tern chicks fully hatched

                Not only have we been seeing more terns on Eastern Brothers, we have been seeing more razorbills as well. It is not uncommon for us to see a few razorbills each day now, where earlier this summer it was rare. Rose saw seven razorbills swimming with the floating decoys at one point this week. I observed 2 razorbills scouting out Eastern Brothers together which gives me some hope of razorbill inhabitance.

IMG_8222 (1)

The moon and the sun together on a beautiful day

                For our guillemot burrow research we cover all of the burrows on Eastern and Western Brothers, that we have found, in a week’s time. The sections of the island are done in a three day rotation. Today for the first time we heard and saw a guillemot egg piping, the guillemot hadn’t quite made it out of his shell yet, but will be next time we check that section of burrows.

 

Until next week,

Jason and Rose

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 34 other followers